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Latest Disaster News

Prizefighter Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter dies at 76Mon, 21 Apr 2014 01:09

FILE - In this June 8, 2001 file photo, former middleweight boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, left, is escorted by an unidentified security guard into the venue where Laila Ali and Jacqui Frazier-Lyde will box each other in Verona, NY. Carter, who spent almost 20 years in jail after twice being convicted of a triple murder he denied committing, died at his home in Toronto, Sunday, April 20, 2014, according to long-time friend and co-accused John Artis. He was 76. (AP Photo/Beth A. Keiser, File)Rubin "Hurricane" Carter never surrendered hope of regaining his freedom, not even after he was convicted of a triple murder, then convicted again and abandoned by many prominent supporters.



With Climate Change, Wildfires Getting Worse in the WestSun, 20 Apr 2014 13:22

With Climate Change, Wildfires Getting Worse in the WestAcross the western United States, wildfires grew bigger and more frequent in the past 30 years, according to a new study that blames climate change and drought for the worsening flames. "It's not just something that is localized to forest or grasslands or deserts," said lead study author Phil Dennison, a geographer at the University of Utah. These fire trends are very consistent with everything we know about how climate change should impact fire in the West," Dennison told Live Science. The number of fires jumped by seven per year since 1984, and fires burned an additional 90,000 acres (36,000 hectares) each year, according to the study, published online April 4 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.



Lack of insurance tied to more emergency surgery: studyFri, 18 Apr 2014 19:01

By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The type of insurance people have is tied to their risk of needing emergency aorta surgery, according to a new study. Compared to people with private insurance, people without insurance were more likely to need emergency surgery on their aorta, the largest artery that supplies blood to every part of the body. Hughes is the study's senior author from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina.