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Storm Emergency Preparedness

Winter Snow Storm Preparedness

Buy a survival kit and store at home along with:

  • Warm coats, gloves or mittens, hats, and water-resistant boots
  • Essential medications

Buy a survival kit and store in your car along with:

  • Warm coats, gloves or mittens, hats, and water-resistant boots
  • Essential medications

Stay tuned for storm warnings:

  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio and your local radio and TV stations for updated storm information.
  • Know what winter storm WATCHES and WARNINGS mean
  • A winter STORM WATCH means a winter storm is possible in your area.
  • A winter STORM WARNING means a winter storm is headed for your area.
  • A BLIZZARD WARNING means strong winds, blind wind-driven snow, and dangerous wind chill are expected. Seek shelter immediately!

When a winter storm WATCH is issued:

  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio, local radio and TV stations, or cable TV such as The Weather Channel for further updates.
  • Be alert to changing weather conditions.
  • Avoid unnecessary travel.

When a winter storm WARNING is issued:

  • Stay indoors during the storm.
  • If you must go outside, several layers of lightweight clothing will keep you warmer than a single heavy coat. Gloves (or mittens) and a hat will prevent loss of body heat. Cover your mouth to protect your lungs.
  • Understand the hazards of wind chill, which combines the cooling effect of wind and cold temperatures on exposed skin. As the wind increases, heat is carried away from a person's body at an accelerated rate, driving down the body temperature.
  • Walk carefully on snowy, icy sidewalks. After the storm, if you shovel snow, be extremely careful. It is physically strenuous work, so take frequent breaks, avoid overexertion.

Avoid traveling by car in a storm, but if you must:

  • Have emergency supplies in the trunk.
  • Keep you car's gas tank full for emergency use and to keep the fuel line from freezing.
  • Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.